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Winter Squash Caponata

30 minutes prep
30 minutes active cooking
1 hour total

Makes 6 - 8 servings

Using winter squash instead of eggplant for this classic Sicilian dish wasn't my idea, but it's a really good one.

The sweet and sour flavor, called agrodolce in Italian, reflects the North African and Spanish influences on Sicilian food.

What you'll need

Ingredients

For the shopping list

1

Winter Squash

2

Celery stalks

2-3 cloves of

Garlic

1

Red Onion

Parsley

From our shop list

Out of stock
As needed Madre Terra

$18 - Sicily - Italy

Optional

$17 - Pantelleria - Sicily

Capers in Sea Salt

$5 - Naples - Italy

Double Concentrated Tomato Paste

$8 - California

Sicilian-style Sevillano Green Olives

$12 - Napa - California

Trio Red Wine Vinegar

$8 - Hatermuma Island - Japan

Okinawan Brown Sugar

$8 - Pantelleria - Sicily

Oregano

$7 - Olhão - Portugal

Fine Sea Salt

Equipment

For the shopping list

1

Chef Knife

1

Mixing Bowl

1

Heavy Skillet

What you'll have to do

Step 1

I think the big, pumpkiny varieties taste better, but you can make this with any winter squash. Cut it into roughly 3/4 inch chunks; you want about 3 cups. Drizzle with olive oil and bake at 350F for about 25 minutes or until tender.

Step 2

While the squash bakes, soak a couple of tablespoons of Pantellerian salted capers in cold water for about 15 minutes, then drain.

Step 3

Chop a red onion and a couple of celery stalks; cook them in olive oil with a good pinch of sea salt for about 5 minutes. Push the vegetables to the side of the skillet and add about 2 tablespoons of tomato paste. Let it cook for a minute or two, then add 2-3 cloves of chopped garlic.

Step 4

Add the cooked squash, the capers, and a handful of coarsely chopped green olives. Stir in a splash (2 tablespoons or so) of Katz Trio red wine vinegar and a couple tablespoons of Okinawan Brown Sugar.

Step 5

Cook gently for another 15 minutes to let the flavors blend, then sprinkle with a few pinches of Pantellerian oregano. Adding a handful of chopped fresh mint leaves would be appropriate, but use Italian parsley if you can’t find mint.

Shop this recipe

Out of stock
Olive Oil

Madre Terra

Madre TerraSicily - Italy
$18
Capers in Sea Salt
Capers, Pickles, & Peppers

Capers in Sea Salt

Bonomo and GiglioPantelleria - Sicily
$17
Double Concentrated Tomato Paste
Pasta & Tomatoes

Double Concentrated Tomato Paste

San MarzanoNaples - Italy
$5
Trio Red Wine Vinegar
Vinegar

Trio Red Wine Vinegar

KatzNapa - California
$12
Okinawan Brown Sugar
Baking

Okinawan Brown Sugar

Murakami SyotenHatermuma Island - Japan
$8
Oregano
Salt, Herbs, & Spices

Oregano

Francesco RafaelePantelleria - Sicily
$8
Fine Sea Salt
Salt, Herbs, & Spices

Fine Sea Salt

NectonOlhão - Portugal
$7

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